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  • Dear HCM Members, We are excited to share the video recordings of five sessions from AOM2021 virtual ...

  • Dear Colleagues, We are approaching the deadline to receive papers for the Special Issue of The Journal ...

  • Dear Colleagues, We are approaching the deadline to receive papers for the Special Issue of The Journal ...

  • Dear Colleagues, We are approaching the deadline to receive papers for the Special Issue of The Journal ...

  • Dear Colleagues, We are approaching the deadline to receive papers for the Special Issue of The Journal ...

AOM News

  • Originally found at Future of Business and Tech How has the pandemic altered workplaces, upended the rules of employer-employee relationships, and evolved how the world works forever? To answer these important questions, The Academy of Management (AOM) gathered leading global workplace scholar experts to showcase research-based insights and make sense of the pandemics workplace evolutions. The association created the panel to provide actionable research-based insights to guide organizations and employees during the pandemic. Prior to, and during the COVID-19 pandemic, AOM scholar members, Peter Bamberger of Tel Aviv University, Adam M. Kleinbaum of Dartmouth College, Tsedal Neeley of Harvard Business School and Jennifer Petriglieri of INSEAD, have studied the hybrid work revolution, employer-employee relationships, work-life balance, what trends might be more pervasive in a post-pandemic future, and more to help enhance employee well-being and engagement. The scholars are globally recognized as experts on the topics of the workplace, remote work, work relationships, and generally how organizations and employees interact. Continue reading the original article at Future of Business and Tech . Read the AOM News release on the SME Panel. Learn more about these AOM Subject Matter Experts and explore their work: Peter Bamberger , Tel Aviv University Adam M. Kleinbaum , Dartmouth College Tsedal Neeley , Harvard Business School Jennifer Petriglieri , INSEAD
  • Originally found at Phys.org by Luke Lambert Resolving the inevitable tensions between countries in disaster-insurance risk pools will ensure a faster and more effective response to extreme-weather catastrophes. A new paper published in the Academy of Management Journal , led and co-authored by Professor Paula Jarzabkowski at Bayes Business School (formerly Cass), has explained how countries can find mutually beneficial arrangements to support low-income countries in the immediate aftermath of a disaster. The report finds that disaster-liquidity insurancewhich provides a rapid release of capital from global reinsurance to support countries in responding to disastercan be better tailored to countries' needs when they actively engage with the inevitable tensions that arise from pooling risk. Continue reading the original article at Phys.org. Read the original research in Academy of Management Journal . Learn more about the AOM Scholars and explore their work: Paula Jarzabkowski, City, University of London, Cass Business School Rebecca Bednarek, Victoria University of Wellington Konstantinos Chalkias, Birkbeck College E ugenia Cacciatori , Cass Business School
  • Originally found at Business Insider by Stephen Jones Promoting your colleagues' ideas over your own could boost your career, according to the authors of a recently published study. People visibly giving credit to their colleagues were viewed as more admired and more influential by their peers, the study of nearly 2,800 people found. The person whose ideas were promoted also benefited, researchers said. In contrast, people who often promoted their own work were disliked, a co-author of the study said. Kristin Bain, assistant professor of management at Rochester Institute of Technology's Saunders College of Business, told Insider the findings showed you don't need to be an "aggressive jerk" to get ahead at work. The results also suggested that promoting the work of other people can raise the profile of groups typically overlooked in organizations, such as women and people of color, she said. For the study, which was published in the Academy of Management Journal , the researchers wanted to understand the effects that amplification which they defined as a public endorsement of another person's ideas, with credit to the person could have on how people were perceived at work. Continue reading the original article at Business Insider . Read the original research in Academy of Management Journal . Read the Insights summary citing this research: Employees Who Boost Marginalized Peers Help Themselves, Too Learn more about the AOM Scholars and explore their work: Kristin Bain , Rochester Institute of Technology Tamar A. Kreps , University of Hawaii at Manoa Nathan L. Meikle , University of Kansas Elizabeth R. Tenney , University of Utah
  • AMJ research shows most successful entrepreneurs do everything they can to avoid risk.
  • In this issue: President's Corner, Board of Governors Nominations, Career Services Job Posts, TLC@AOM Call for Volunteers